Editor’s Note: The post below was taken from our previous Joomla website and is shown here to enable users to access older posts (since this was first written we have moved server type and CMS platform; from Joomla! to WordPress):

Well, it has been a day of discovery for me. I am now busy installing Virtuemart (VM) in Joomla 3.2.3 (the current version as of today – V3.3 is due in April, about 2 weeks away).

At the moment the VM team are finishing off the code upgrade of VM2 to VM2.6 (the main difference appears to be that the core code in VM2.6 is Joomla 3 ready). But VM2.x is for Joomla! 2.5, not for Joomla! 3. The current VM test release is 2.5.2, and it seems stable enough to become the stable (final?) release – VM2.6.

The VM team have already modified VM to install under Joomla! 3, that version is currently a test version called VM2.1.1. It is that version I have installed, but is, at the least, in need of work in the admin panels before it can be used for real.

Quite a few errors popped up, mostly expected for any installation of VM, I now understand. A safe path needed to be created and entered into the VM configuration, having created the folder above the public_folder and with the correct permissions (700 seems to work). Another reported error related to the upload_tmp_dir setting in the php.ini configuration file. Luckily, we have CPanel WHM so this was easy to change and the server’s Apache service then needed to be re-started.

As soon as VM2.6 releases, the VM team plans to port the core code into the installation wrapper that they used in VM2.1.1 and they will release VVM2.9.0, the first real test release of VM for Joomla 3. All that is planned for the next 2 weeks!! Then I shall beaver away to write the css code to make VM2.9 look great with the Cleanlogic template (I will post the css files up here when I am done).

Time for a beer. A bottle of ‘Old Thumper’ is looking good right now.

Editor’s Note: The post below was taken from our previous Joomla website and is shown here to enable users to access older posts (since this was first written we have moved server type and CMS platform; from Joomla! to WordPress):

So, having worked to get the Cleanlogic template from Crosstec working nicely, we found that it did not support Two Factor Authentication (2FA) and, despite assurances otherwise, Crosstec did not seem to be hurrying to fix this.

Yours truly decided to roll his sleeves and do a bit of digging in the Cleanlogic template code, and (of course), I think I have fixed it. Two files needed to be modified:

  1. In the public_html/templates/cleanlogic-for-joomla-3.x/html/com_users/login folder rename the file default_login.php to default_login.bak, and replace it with a new default_login.php file.
  2. In the public_html/templates/cleanlogic-for-joomla-3.x/html/mod_login folder rename the file default.php to default.bak, and replace it with a new default.php file.

cls65pro-riser75wHobo Lighting have, for some years, produced the very popular CLS65 5-section compact reflex light stand. The CLS65 was manufactured to some very artificial constraints; namely that it folded down to 500mm or less, and an extended height of over 2m, weighed less than 1kg and could safely take the load of a simple stand adapter, speedlight and umbrella, amounting to about 1.5kg in total.

But, in order that these artificial constraints could be achieved, many compromises had to be made. Many joints were riveted, the tube sections used were narrow and the riser clamp collars were pared down to a minimum. Photographers using them persistently asked, ‘Why?’ Why does the CLS65 feel fragile? Why can’t it take a heavier load? Why did this collar clamp snap (yes, about 0.5% did, usually when nearly new)? Why isn’t the stand designed to be repaired? Why can’t the stand come with a decent quality carry bag, instead of this lightweight drawstring bag?

And so the CLS65 Pro has been designed, tooled and produced, and at a very competitive price, typically about £5-6 lower selling price than the CLS65. The CLS65 Pro addresses all the questions being asked of the CLS65, and with an increase in weight of only 175g. It feels sturdier, uses wider section tubing, has cam ‘flip’ type riser clamps, uses nuts and bolts wherever possible (with spares and a toolkit provided), can take a much heavier load and has a nice sturdy carry bag. So, come on, why don’t you buy one now? Or, buy in multiple quantities and get even better pricing.

Editor’s Note: The post below was taken from our previous Joomla website and is shown here to enable users to access older posts (since this was first written we have moved server type and CMS platform; from Joomla! to WordPress):

One factor that had dissuaded us from running our own website was management of the content. Hence the decision to use Joomla! as the content management. However, the bane of sites using content management systems is the hacker. For some time banks have countered the username/password hackers by using two factor authentication, where a third means of identification is needed to login, which only the account holder knows, and is different each time they login. Some banks use a device to do this, others randomly selected characters in a predetermined phrase.

Google have now made available an app for smartphones called Google Authenticator. It is available in iOS, Android and Blackberry implementations. It is best used with a barcode scanning app, for example, on Android, the Barcode Scanner app. Having installed those two apps on your smartphone, you need to go into the administrator backend of Joomla! 3.x. Go to the Plugin Manager and find the Two Factor Authentication – Google Authenticator plugin (you can filter using twofactorauth as the filter) and enable it. If you have just installed Joomla! and you are at the back-end screen, you should have a message asking if you want to enable Two Factor Authentication, in which case you can enable it by clicking the button. Then go in to edit the plugin’s settings and enable the site section you want to use it for. For now I have it set to Administration back-end only, but I will enable it for the user front-end when we go live.

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Editor’s Note: The [edited] post below was taken from our previous Joomla website and is shown here to enable users to access older posts (since this was first written we have moved server type and CMS platform; from Joomla! to WordPress):

If you saw this site when I first made it live, you might have noticed that the print and email icons to the top right of the articles were black and not in keeping with the site schema. A few extra lines of css and some new image files and that’s fixed. An archive file containing the three files is downloadable form the foot of this article. They need to be extracted to the images-source folder of the cleanlogic-for-joomla-3.x template folder.

Here is the css that needs to be added to the end of the template.css file found in the css folder of cleanlogic-for-joomla-3.x template folder: (more…)

Editor’s Note: The post below was taken from our previous Joomla website and is shown here to enable users to access older posts (since this was first written we have moved server type and CMS platform; from Joomla! to WordPress):

This has been a long time in the making and is the first step towards our own online shop, to run alongside our shop on eBay.

We now have our own web server (obviously). We have actually had one for many years to serve our email and provide hosting for images used in our eBay listings, with a variety of web hosts, but they have always been shared servers with dubious uptimes and slow data speeds. So, with this new site in mind, we have forked out for a Managed VPS, from Big Brain Global Networks, using a voucher deal from Web Hosting Talk VPS Offers. The folks at BBGN have been absolutely fantastic in helping us get started.

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